Quinola Blog

Find out about what we've been up to, useful tips and info on how eating quinoa as part of a healthy diet helps prevent diabetes.

Find out about what we've been up to, useful tips and info on how eating quinoa as part of a healthy diet helps prevent diabetes.

files/Homepage.png
files/Homepage.png

News

A letter to the Guardian

Dear Sir, In response to your quinoa article on the 14th of January, I would like to highlight the significant difference between Peruvian and Bolivian quinoa production as a Peruvian quinoa importer. Peruvians still consume the majority of their quinoa production domestically and typically, practice mixed agriculture rather than monoculture. Malnutrition amongst the communities with which we work is non-existent and land is not in short supply. The limiting factor in quinoa production is capital rather than acreage for the farmers of Cabaña with whom we work, so we have been helping them expand their micro finance scheme to provide capital...

Discover more


Peruvian Farmer stood in front of quinoa field

Higher Quinoa prices: a good thing for our farmers

  A well argued article about the benefits of higher prices to quinoa farmers of the Altiplano. It puts the well intention but unrepresentative article, that appeared in the  Guardian last week, into perspective.  http://www.slate.com/articles/life/food/2013/01/quinoa_bad_for_bolivian_and_peruvian_farmers_ignore_the_media_hand_wringing.htm

Discover more


Farmer and farmer family holding quinola packets in front of quinoa field

Quinola is the best quinoa of Peru. How so?

Quinola was voted Peru’s best quinoa at Mistura, Peru’s premier gastronomic event. And they should know as the Peruvians eat the most quinoa in the world! But how, you ask? Surely, quinoa is quinoa. Well no. There are over 3000 different varieties of quinoa growing in the Andes, as the crop has never been properly selectively bred like wheat, rice or corn (where genetic diversity has taken a big hit as a result). So much in the same way that you get awful rice you can get some pretty sludgy quinoa. With Quinola Mothergrain you can be assured of the...

Discover more


bees flying

Pesticides and the fate of the bees

The strange decline of huge swathes of the bee population in Europe can be put down to the excessive use of pesticides, that are used across the vast majority of European agricultural land. Neonicotinoids, that kill insects via their effect on the central nervous system, are a particular worry. Although they do not typically kill bees outright, they impair the bee’s navigational senses. As such the bees never make it back to their hives and die. For the future of our ecodiversity such practices are quite clearly not sustainable. An obvious answer to this issue would be an outright ban...

Discover more